Equipment Repair Advice from the Experts

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Jeff Headings:

The best way to prolong the life of your equipment is staff education. The more someone knows about flexible endoscopes and the importance of proper storage, handling and reprocessing of endoscopes, the longer the endoscope will last.

It cannot be stressed enough how easily endoscopes can be damaged and how critical proper handling and storage is to the life expectancy of equipment.

Communication between doctors and staff is also important. Doctors who use endoscopes daily can indicate when the function of a specific endoscope is deteriorating and staff should pass concerns or complaints about equipment on to their repair facility.

This will help with proper maintenance of the endoscope and ensure all equipment is in the safest condition during patient procedures.

5. What criteria should endoscopy equipment purchasers use to determine when to let go of well-functioning equipment in favor of more modern models?

Harvey Buxbaum:

There are both economic as well as technical factors to consider when making the decision to upgrade to newer, more modern models.

A. Are the technical improvements in the more modern models worth the high purchase price?

B. Will the trade-in value of the older, well-functioning equipment significantly offset the high purchase price of the new, modern marvels?

C. Most manufacturer’s “obsolete" or refuse to support older, well-functioning equipment so that they can force users to buy newer, expensive instrumentation. Independent repair companies, however, have the spare parts and technical expertise to maintain and repair these older instruments almost indefinitely. Therefore, well-functioning, older equipment can be used for many years.

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