New Process Decreases Risk of Colorectal SSIs

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CHICAGO―A project to reduce colorectal surgical site infections (SSIs) saved more than $3.7 million in costs for 135 avoided SSIs. The two-and-a-half year project included seven hospitals and was directed by the Joint Commission Center for Transforming Healthcare in collaboration with the American College of Surgeons. 

The participating hospitals were able to reduce superficial incisional SSIs, which affect skin and underlying tissue, by 45 percent and all types of colorectal SSIs by 32 percent. The average length of stay for hospital patients with any type of colorectal SSI decreased from an average of 15 days to 13 days. In comparison, patients with no SSIs had an average length of stay of eight days.

The seven healthcare organizations and systems that volunteered to address colorectal SSIs as a critical patient safety problem were:

• Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles

• Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

• Mayo Clinic-Rochester Methodist Hospital, Rochester, Minn.

• North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Great Neck, N.Y.

• Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago

• OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, Ill.

• Stanford Hospital & Clinics, Palo Alto, Calif.

Colorectal surgery was identified as the focus of the project because SSIs are disproportionately higher among patients following colorectal surgeries. Colorectal surgery is a common procedure across different types of hospitals, can have significant complications, presents significant opportunities for improvement, and has high variability in performance across hospitals. The project addressed preadmission, preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative and post discharge follow-up processes for all surgical patients undergoing emergency and elective colorectal surgery, with the exception of trauma and transplant patients and patients under the age of 18. Project participants studied the potential factors that contribute to all three types of colorectal SSIs – superficial incisional, deep incisional and organ space SSIs, which affect organs and the space surrounding them.

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