National Benchmarks for Finding Polyps Might Be Too Low

Comments
Posted in News, Polyps, Research
Print

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.—Current national guidelines provide benchmarks regarding the number of polyps physicians should detect, on average, during a colonoscopy. Recent studies at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida suggest these benchmarks may be too low.

The Mayo study, in the online issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, found that use of high-definition imaging tools in 2,400 individuals undergoing a screening colonoscopy at the clinic led to an adenoma detection rate (ADR) of 25 percent in women and 41 percent in men. Current national guidelines set the benchmark ADR at 15 percent in women and 25 percent in men for individuals at average risk of colorectal cancer—those without a family history or symptoms of the cancer.

Adenomas are potentially precancerous polyps, and ADR is defined as the percentage of screened patients with at least one adenoma detected. So, a 15 percent ADR in women means 15 of 100 women screened were found to have at least one potentially precancerous polyp.

“Our study suggests that national benchmarks may be too low given our increasing ability to find polyps using the high-definition colonoscopy tools that a majority of physicians use today," said Michael Wallace, MD, MPH, chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

« Previous12Next »
Comments
comments powered by Disqus